• Phone : (207) 594-5166
  • Address : 8 North Main St. Rockland ME 04841
Georges River Land Trust

Tucked away in the upper headwaters of the scenic Georges River in Liberty sits an idyllic island hideaway on Stevens Pond called Quigg Island. We’re thrilled to announce we have acquired a 40-acre parcel on the northern section of the island that is now protected forever! Together, we have safeguarded a thriving ecosystem, and ensured recreational access to this special place for generations to come. Thank you to all our donors! Watch the video below to get a sense of this magical place.

 

In November 2020, we led the first public forum (on Zoom) discussing the future management and public uses of the Quigg Island Community Forest. **Watch the video here.**
We’d love to hear your ideas – E-mail Annette

Public Access

An easy paddle from the public boat launch on Rt. 173, the conserved 40-acre parcel on the northern end of Quigg Island is a perfect destination for outdoor exploring. Its hemlock and white pine forest is carpeted with mosses, ferns and mushrooms. Trails crisscross the island leading to spectacular lookouts with views across Steven’s Pond.

Access to GRLT’s parcel of Quigg Island is available only by boat. Boaters can use the public landing on Rt. 173 to put in.  

Public Landing | Stephens Pond

Protecting Wildlife at Risk

Shallow waters and wetlands surrounding the island provide habitat for sensitive birds like herons, egrets, and bald eagles. Quigg Island is a critical piece of habitat which could be lost to development and conflicting land uses.

Supporting a Healthy Climate

The island, entirely wooded, is helping to mitigate global warming. Hemlock is a slow-growing species that can live for hundreds of years. The forest provides significant ecological value, supporting wildlife, microbial communities, absorbing water, and sequestering carbon to name a few.

Ensuring a Sustainably Managed Forest

The Land Trust will follow in the legacy of the Robbins brothers, of Robbins Lumber, who thoughtfully managed this forest for the last 50 years for a healthy stand of pine and hemlock.  Their sustainable timber management also protected healthy wildlife habitat. Through a nationally competitive grant for a “community forest project”, the Land Trust was awarded funding for this project.